Archive for the ‘Checklist for Bathroom Remodeling Plans’ Category

Kitchen and Bathroom Solutions

Monday, October 5th, 2009
by: ARA
 Home improvement has become one of our country’s greatest pastimes. Americans spent an estimated $214 billion on home improvements, maintenance and repairs in 2001, according to Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies research report issued in February 2003. Just how and where that money is spent can make a big difference when it comes to investing in your home.Of all the rooms in your house, bathrooms represent the greatest and fastest return on your remodeling investment. According to Remodeling Magazine, more than 80 percent of your bathroom remodeling expenses can be recouped within a year of resale. Not every room in the house offers such a return. Surprisingly, kitchens are sixth on the list with just over 60 percent of the costs returned. Only bathroom additions beat bathroom remodeling with returns over 90 percent.

Despite today’s homeowner remodeling craze, you should weigh the pros and cons of taking on an entire bathroom project alone. Knowledge — including admitting your strengths and weaknesses — is the key to successfully completing any project on time and under budget. Ask yourself the following remodeling questions to ensure you are making the best decisions for your investment.

Is it a Remodel or Makeover?

“The first consideration should be the scope of work,” says Rick Peters, remodeling expert and author of “MoneySmart Makeovers: Bathrooms.” He asks: “Do you understand your home’s plumbing systems, such as where the waste/vent stack is?”

If the remodeling project involves more than cosmetic fixture replacements or surface redecorating, it may be time to call in an expert to assess your home’s plumbing and pipe placement. Peters suggests the following checklist:

Call a remodeling contractor when:

* Moving a toilet, sink, tub or shower

* Removing or adding walls

* Installing venting that runs through the roof

All of these projects require specific skills and knowledge of your local building and plumbing codes.

Try the following makeover projects yourself:

* Replacing a faucet, sink or toilet using existing plumbing

* Installing shower or shower-tub combination doors

* Installing new accessories, such as shelves or light fixtures

* Painting, tiling or wallpapering

These projects require some skill base, but even a first-time do-it-yourselfer may be able to complete them in a reasonable timeframe.

What’s the Real Deal on What You Want?

Tempted by what looks good? Check out the quality. Does that new faucet have rubber washers or plastic valves? A client of mine bought a faucet five years ago with plastic valves and it lasted exactly four and a half years. Cheaper versions of the real thing are not repairable and have to be replaced entirely. This means you are spending twice as much in 10 years as you would once in a lifetime for a better faucet.

Look for quality fixture manufacturers such as American Standard. The company’s Champion Toilet featuring America’s Best Flushing System, includes a Worry-Free Decade Warranty that covers the whole toilet inside and out. American Standard’s faucets come with a lifetime warranty on the washerless watertight seal, the function and the finish. Most of its sinks and toilets are made of vitreous china that resists dirt and bacteria. Even the acrylic tubs are made tougher with a fiberglass bonding for extra strength.

Bottom line: “Your bathroom takes a daily beating,” says Peters. “Buy quality.”

Is There a Great Cover-up Waiting for You?

A number of times, I’ve ventured into bathrooms that have been madeover by covering damaged tiles or walls with acrylic panels. “Sure it looks better, but the problem is still there,” says Peters. “In fact, panels like these hold in moisture and mildew that was the problem in the first place, and now it will get worse. Make sure leaks and damage are repaired and not just covered up.”

Peters also suggests using a mildew resistant drywall. “Standard drywall can’t stand up to the moisture in the air, even with proper venting,” he notes.

What’s your pay-off in investing time to answer these important questions before you start? You’ll end up with a successful bathroom remodeling project that adds to the value and enjoyment of your home.

Kitchen and Bathroom Solutions

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Bathroom Interior Design

Monday, October 5th, 2009
Any advice or guide on the interior design of a bathroom should be based around one
simple concept: keep it simple. Rooms inside of a home should have functional aspects,
and if one room is designed for very specific functions, it is the bathroom. There have
always been many jokes about the “throne” of a home, but the honest fact is that creating
a visibly appealing and comfortable bathroom will inspire positive feelings to its users.

Hardware choices should be the primary concern when designing a bathroom. Faucets
and spigots, as well as tubs and toilets, produced in a variety of shapes and materials can
centerpiece a design. Open showers are currently popular with the younger upwardly-
mobile crowd, and claw-foot bathtubs are almost always considered to be classic and
attractive. Evaluate privacy issues first; don’t put the toilet and tub too close together.

Is it a possibility to center your bathroom around a favorite theme? The answer is most
certainly “yes.” Keeping in mind that “less is more” while choosing a decoration pattern
that will coordinate with the rest of the home will open many design possibilities.
Finding a color or pattern inspiration from simple or small artwork may be the first step
toward creating a bathroom masterpiece.

When designing a bathroom’s tiling, take the time to shop around through different
hardware, decoration and craft stores. The more expensive of the different types of tiles
should have durability, aesthetic value, and a non-porous surface. It should be easily
cleaned and sanitized, and it needs to install easily without any expensive or caustic glues
or cements. Get creative also; all tile in bathrooms need not be made of porcelain.

After the design and production of a space-conscious and attractive bathroom have been
completed, focus on decoration accessories to bring out personality and individualism.
The bathroom is the most sacred room of any interior, and placing prized possessions on
the walls or shelves is an interesting way to bless this special room. Use courageous
ideas and do not be afraid to take chances, but above all: keep it simple.

by: Allan Wilson

About the author:
There is nothing more rewarding then improving the look and value of your own home. For free quotes about home improvement visit:http://www.homecontractorsdirect.com

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